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News 30 May 13

Serbia Offers Montenegro Translations Of EU 'Acquis'

Serbia will hand Montenegro more than 50,000 pages of EU "acquis" translated into Serbian with the aim of boosting the two countries' European integration.

Milena Milosevic
BIRN
Podgorica

Suzana Grubjesic, Serbian vice-prime minister for European intgegration, will deliver translations of EU domentation to her Montenegrin counterpart, Igor Luksic, on Thursday.

The move is aimed at "strengthening cooperation between the two countries on their path to European integration", the Serbian government stated on Wednesday.

The translations of the acquis will be handed over at the press conference following the meeting between Grubjesic and Luksic.

The EU acquis is the accumulated legislation, legal acts, and court decisions which constitute the body of EU law.

Croatia, which is set to join the European club on July 1, has also offered help to Montenegro on its path towards EU membership in the form of translations.

Last year, the two countries signed a mutual agreement on Euro-Atlantic partnership, which was designed to assist Montenegro’s EU and NATO accession goals.

The agreement gave Montenegro access to Croatian translations of EU legislations adopted since 2009, adding to the pile of Croatian translations of earlier EU legal acts given to Montenegro.

Montenegro launched membership talks with the EU in June 2012. So far, it has temporarily closed two chapters, 25 and 26, on Science and Research and on Education and Culture.

The opening of the most challenging chapters, 23 and 24, which focus on enhancing the fight against corruption and organized crime, is still pending.

Serbia obtained EU candidate status in March 2012. On April 21, the European Commission recommended opening negotiations on accession.

 

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