Home Page
 
04 Sep 09

Bosnia Makes No Progress on Corruption

Bosnia and Herzegovina has made no recent progress in its struggle against rampant corruption, the Bosnian branch of Transparency International, TI, reports.
Srecko Latal
TI presented its findings at a Sarajevo press conference on Thursday.

“Bosnia and Herzegovina has not achieved progress in implementing anti-corruption reforms and, unfortunately [...] it is perceived as the most corrupt country in the region," said Emir Djikic, chair of the TI Board of Directors in Bosnia.

Transparency International has been monitoring anti-corruption activities in most sensitive areas, including the progress of legislative and executive authorities in implementing anti-corruption measures and in processing corruption cases in the courts.

TI has also kept an eye on legislative changes and on the implementation of laws on conflict of interests, the financing of political parties and the Election Law. It has also looked at the functioning of public sector auditing agencies, police and security-intelligence agencies, and at changes in the Public Procurement Law.

Across this broad spectrum, Bosnia “has not accomplished any progress in fighting against corruption,” TI claims.

The TI research found that Bosnians believe that corruption is most prevalent in the privatization process and in the functioning of political parties.

Respondents said that doctors and other medical workers are still the most likely to solicit bribes, including money, gifts or favours. Police officers came second in the corruption stakes. Those spoken to by researchers said they gave medical staff 124 euros and police 14 euros on average. University professors reportedly demand the highest average bribes, at 219 euros.

Most also emphasised the problem of corruption in employment procedures, TI said that it is alarming that up to 57 per cent of those surveyed personally knew someone who was employed through connections or nepotism in a municipal, cantonal, entity or state institution, organisation or public company.

A majority of respondents think that the law on conflict of interests is ineffective, and only half had heard of the law on freedom of access to information, TI said.

Concluding, the TI report expressed the organisations' hope that “citizens' views will finally influence government representatives in Bosnia and Herzegovina to take […] corruption more seriously and truly engage in solving this problem.”

Talk about it!

blog comments powered by Disqus

Related Headlines:

bosnian-croat-ex-military-chief-appeals-for-acquittal-03-22-2017
22 Mar 17

Bosnian Croat Ex-Military Chief Appeals for Acquittal

Slobodan Praljak, the former chief of the Croatian Defence Council’s Main Headquarters, appealed against his conviction for war crimes against Bosniaks in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1993 and 1994.

22 Mar 17

Vanished Mural Sparks Protests in Novi Sad

22 Mar 17

Belgrade Tween Conquers World of Music

22 Mar 17

Montenegro Broadcaster Names New Chief

22 Mar 17

Europe is not Going to Solve Balkan Dramas

Premium Selection

bosnian-authorities-ignore-us-warnings-on-crime-03-22-2017
22 Mar 17

Bosnian Authorities Ignore US Warnings on Crime

The Bosnian authorities are dismissing or failing to take serious notice of US government reports warning that the country is vulnerable to corruption, organized crime or even terrorism.

vanished-mural-sparks-protests-in-novi-sad-03-22-2017
22 Mar 17

Vanished Mural Sparks Protests in Novi Sad

Artist Guillaume Alby aka Remed says Serbia’s authorities are trying to ‘keep people blind’ after his striking mural in the city of Novi Sad was suddenly painted over.

22 Mar 17

Belgrade Tween Conquers World of Music